WHICH CRICKET SHOES ARE RIGHT FOR YOU?

It’s time to gear up for the cricket season!

With many shoes for the three main disciplines of cricket, buying the right cricket shoe can be difficult. But our cricket shoe guru, Sportsmart’s Footwear Manager, Ryan, is here to help.

Q. What makes a good cricket shoe?

There are many basic aspects of a cricket shoe that will affect the way you play and which shoe is the correct fit for you.

The Upper

The upper is the top of the shoe that wraps around your foot. It is in close contact with your foot, so it has to be comfortable. The upper is designed to support the key areas and can also provide ventilation.

Bowlers: Need an upper that, when planting their foot, doesn’t allow the foot to budge or irritate the big toe as it hits the pitch. Generally have a high cut upper.

Batsmen: Need an upper that allows movement, but also protects feet. The upper is generally less rigid, providing greater flexibility to allow greater ease of movement. Many feature a mesh upper which helps to reduce weight.

The Outsole

The outsole is the layer that is in direct contact with the ground. The playing surface will affect the type of shoe needed. Generally, when playing on a synthetic surface, the outsole will be made up of a rubber dimple design. This allows for maximum traction on artificial surfaces. When playing on turf, all cricketers are required to wear spikes for increased grip. Both bowlers and batsmen need grip, but for different reasons.

Bowlers: Regardless of the surface, bowlers require maximum traction for running in as well as landing at the wicket. Bowling boots tend to have very flat outsoles with more spikes for grip.

Batsmen: Need to grip the pitch when they’re running. Batsmen shoes usually have a half spike to provide the right amount of traction for both running and playing their shots.

The Midsole

The midsole is the layer between the outsole and the insole, and is designed for shock absorption and comfort.

Bowlers: Need cushioning as they run into bowl, so a shoe with a good midsole is preferable. Cushioning is more important in a bowlers shoe.

Batsmen: Need a lot of cushioning to make their innings as comfortable as possible.

The sock liner

Cricket shoe sock liners often feature extra cushioning for improved comfort. Most cricket shoes will also feature additional heel supports to maximise support to the foot under a range of actions.

Q. How do I know which cricket shoe is right for me?

Firstly, it depends on the playing surface. All cricketers playing on turf will require spiked cricket shoes, while those playing on synthetic will usually require a rubber outsole. Other considerations include personal preferences, your position and budget. Visit us in store for more advice!

Q. Which cricket shoe brands does Sportsmart stock?

Sportsmart sells a range of senior and junior cricket shoes from brands including Asics, New Balance and Kookaburra.

Q. What is the main difference between a high-priced and low-priced cricket shoes?

The main difference is comfort and cushioningHigher priced cricket shoes tend to have more support, comfort and cushioning and tend to last longer. Lower priced cricket shoes have less of these attributes and tend to not last as long.

Q. What are the most popular batsman cricket shoes?

Q. What are the most popular bowler cricket shoes?

Q. What are the most popular all-rounder cricket shoes?

Q. What are the most popular kids cricket shoes?

Q. What are your top cricket shoe picks this season?

ASICS GEL ODI

ASICS GEL STRIKE RATE 4

A70_542804_500

NEW BALANCE CK4030R2

A70_543560_500

ASICS GEL HARDWICKET 5 GS

A72_542806_500

NEW BALANCE KC4020DY

A72_543564_500

ASICS GEL PEAK 4

A70_542815_500

NEW BALANCE CK4020R2

A70_543562_500

ASICS GEL 100 NOT OUT GS

KOOKABURRA PRO 1200 RUBBER JUNIOR 

Visit us in store for more advice and to browse our range of cricket shoes.

Remember, Smart Card members save more – sign up online or in store.

All the best for your cricket season!

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